Ayder Plateau

Ayder Plateau

Ayder Plateau

Ayder is a yayla (summer resort) in Rize Province, Turkey. (The word yayla may also mean Alpine pasture.)

Geography

Ayder at 40°57′N 41°05′E is a typical yayla with no settled population; it hosts visitors during summers. The average altitude is 1,350 metres (4,430 ft). It is a part of Çamlıhemşin district of Rize Province. The distance to Çamlıhemşin is 17 kilometres (11 mi) and to Rize is 88 kilometres (55 mi).
 
 

As a resort

Although well known locally, the first mention of Ayder in official papers was in 1871 when the hot springs in Ayder were noted. The temperature of the water is 550C (1310F); however, the most attractive feature of Ayder is its dense forestry and a number of waterfalls nearby. In 1987 the location was declared a tourist center by the government. Ayder is also famous for its rhododendron honey, which is produced in beehives hung on trees.
Ayder is plateau/highland with an elevation of 1350m along the Black Sea. It is 17 km from Çamlıhemşin. Ayder is famous for its thermal springs, world famous Anzer honey and trekking routes. The area around the Ayder highland village used for trekking to the Kaçkar mountains.
 
The Ayder Plateau is a place to cool off from the heat of summer. It is also allow your mind and body to simply relax, away from the stress and tempo of city life. The Ayder Valley lies between Rize and Artvin and is located at the point where the Fırtına River meets the Black Sea. It's hard not to get impatient on the way to Ayder, but it would be a good idea to stop and rest at Çamlıhemşin, in the Fırtına Valley. From here, start to follow the river, with its unique bridges and its century-old traditions. The Ayder Plateau lies above the beautiful river, with its varieties of trees and flowers lining both sides. When ascending this plateau, make sure you stick to the right, because from the right-hand side of the road you can view a gorgeous waterfall, which seems to be on display for you alone. It is really fantasic scene. Pay attention to the unique mountain-style homes here, the women picking tea leaves and the very basic gondolas transporting people from one high point to another.